Day 39, Tuesday November 3, 1998

Giovanni Soldini finally finished on a gray rainy morning just before 8:30 a.m. local time. It took him almost four hours more than predicted to cross the finish line with 3-4 knot wind and 14 foot swells. Isabelle Autissier greeted Soldini with a hug as he stepped onto the dock. His elapsed time for the leg was 37 days, 14hours, 14minutes and 42 seconds. In the previous race he would finish second with his time, but this time it was good enough only for a fifth. He arrived at Cape Town 2 days, 18 hours, 9 minutes and 58 seconds behind winner Mike Golding.

FolSodiniOnDeck.jpg (24861 bytes)
Giovanni Soldini

"Going so far north at the start was a big mistake, but who could know," said Soldini. "Tropical Storm Lisa came out and stole all the wind." Before he knew it he was forced to work off a 400-mile gap with the leader. "I sailed hard and saw the miles shorten, 250 then 200 miles," said Soldini. "All I could do was sail hard and I did and I broke the one-day record of 386.9 nautical miles."

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Fila

"Then there was this story of a cold front in the southern Atlantic. It was crazy, I mean, it was too much. I was pushing like crazy to stay behind the front," he said. "Then it passed over me and slowed down, and all the other boats stayed in front of it. I was obliged to stay south, otherwise I would get stuck in high pressure. But now the other boats are a very long way ahead. In the next legs I will do my race the best I can. And then we'll see."

In Class II J.P. Mouligne was with just 500 miles to go. He wrote: "The sea is not rough but the swells are big and I can only imagine what they will look like in 50 knots of wind... If all goes well Mike and Brad cannot catch me but the simplest mistake can cost me the leg. As soon as it was day light this morning, I did a good inspection of the rig and sails. All look normal. I also always check the stern to make sure that I am not dragging anything like a rope or an old fish net." His first place looks secured. Next boat is 200 miles back and Garside on third place reported problems with autopilot.

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Foto Richard Konkolski

Davie was still holding fourth position, but Stricker was closing the gap. Petersen on fifth position reported: "I spent the day trying to write, but it was not good. So I slept fitfully. Robin Davie and I have been coming up on the radio regularly now twice a day. He is making good miles with his improvised rudder." Only the last sailor of second class did not experience any special excitement. Neil wrote: "Weather much the same but then I suppose that's the nature of trade winds. Thanks. See y'all tomorrow, Neil."
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Paladin II Foto Billy Black

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Golding

Team Group 4

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

2

Autissier

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

3

Thiercelin

Somewhere

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

4

Hall

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

5

Soldini

Fila

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

6

Konioukhov

Mod Univ Human

08 44S

032 48W

3194

8.6

3194.1

1720

7

Reidl

Project Amazon

Retired

0

0

0

0

0

Class 2

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Mouligne

Cray Valley

37 11S

009 12E

491

10.5

0

2144

2

Van Liew

Balance Bar

37 34S

005 03E

687

9

195.3

2144

3

Garside

Magellan Alpha

37 53S

004 13E

730

10.3

238.6

2144

4

Davie

South Caroline

32 28S

019 51W

1913

6.8

1421.5

2144

5

Stricker

Rapscallion III

31 08S

019 55W

1936

8.6

1444.2

2144

6

Petersen

No Barriers

25 55S

022 43W

2178

7.5

1686.3

2144

7

Yazykov

Wind of Change

21 46S

023 39W

2330

8.9

1838.5

2144

8

Saito

Shuten-dohji

23 50S

025 34W

2370

8

1878.4

2144

9

Hunter

Paladin II

12 32S

029 21W

2896

6.3

2404.8

2144

Copyright Richard Konkolski
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