Day 40, Wednesday November 4, 1998

There was no longer any excitement in Class 1. The only sailor still on the sea was Konioukhov more than 3000 miles away from Cape Town and of course with no communication link except scarce messages through his son. But there was a lot action going on in Class II.

ZapadVlna.jpg (9432 bytes)
Foto Richard Konkolski

Stricker on Rapscallion III was able to pass Robin Davie and got 20 miles in front of his crippled boat. Robin Davie was beginning his fifth day of racing without a rudder. He was averaging six-plus knots, but the handicap was beginning to take its toll.

BBRapscallionIIIStearn.jpg (24779 bytes)
Rapscallion III Foto Billy Black

Class II leader J.P. Mouligne had 326 miles left to sail. Brad Van Liew and Mike Garside had little hope of winning, but Garside made huge gain on Van Liew and the race for second was wide open. JP wrote: "I had a fairly slow night, straight down wind, and heading more toward Antarctica than Cape Town. It is hard when you are so close but cannot point the bow directly toward the finish line. Early this morning I decided to gibe and I am now moving well with a strong west to northwest wind going directly for the line still 326 miles away."

Robin Davie was able to explain his way of handling his boat. "With no rudder, there is no directional stability to the boat's movement," he wrote. "It's like a windsurfing, where you have no rudder, and it is your movement, weight distribution, and direction you heel or move the sail plan that will define the sailboard's directional movement. I see no point in the conventional wisdom of trying to rig up a rudder with a spinnaker pole, because then I would have to stand and steer at the end of this ridiculous great pole. If a windsurfer needs no rudder, surely we can get the boat to steer by balance."

Davie unrolled the inner jib, sheeted in, and South Carolina promptly tacked and came to a halt with the sail backed the opposite tack. This happened 6 or 8 times until he realized it could not work out. But with some experimentation Davie soon learned that if he kept the inner jib backed, set his larger genoa, and hoisted a scrap of main, he could make progress in the general direction give or take 40 or so degrees of wandering. He also streamed a 300-foot line from stern for additional control.

BBSouthCarolina.jpg (22418 bytes)
South Caroline Foto Billy Black

"Today the wind is building and with the stronger winds the boat's motion has become poor," he explained. "Because of the way the inner jib is backed, the boat's motion is not normal. It's quite jerky, especially when we head up into the wind and seas. The normal ride tends to be natural, easy and fluid. Now it is taut and forced. South Carolina has a new battle cry: Shake, rattle and roll."

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Golding

Team Group 4

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

2

Autissier

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

3

Thiercelin

Somewhere

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

4

Hall

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

5

Soldini

Fila

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

6

Konioukhov

Mod Univ Human

11 40S

031 34W

3033

11.2

3032.6

1022

7

Reidl

Project Amazon

Retired

0

0

0

0

0

Class 2

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Mouligne

Cray Valley

36 53S

012 52E

326

12.4

0

1544

2

Van Liew

Balance Bar

37 29S

007 49E

559

9.8

233.6

1544

3

Garside

Magellan Alpha

38 15S

007 57E

571

11.6

245.1

1544

4

Stricker

Rapscallion III

31 53S

017 11W

1790

8.4

1463.9

1544

5

Davie

South Caroline

33 42S

018 05W

1811

6.2

1485.4

1544

6

Petersen

No Barriers

27 06S

020 44W

2052

7.5

1726.5

1544

7

Yazykov

Wind of Change

23 48S

021 43W

2180

9.2

1853.9

1544

8

Saito

Shuten-dohji

25 46S

024 01W

2246

8.2

1920.3

1544

9

Hunter

Paladin II

14 13S

028 21W

2791

6.5

2465.4

1544

Copyright Richard Konkolski
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