Day 41, Thursday November 5, 1998

By the end of the day Mouligne was about forty miles from the finish line. He should finish early morning tomorrow. About 220 miles behind him there was a tough fight for second place. Garside moved from third to second place, then dropped back and again regained second place.

FolMagelanAlphaAir3.jpg (18811 bytes)
Magellan Alpha

Garside's last 24 hours had been unbelievably hairy as he described in his mail: ". I've had winds up to 50 knots and I've been surfing for up to 30 minutes non-stop at 24 knots hanging on for grim death. My third reefing line broke so I have had to drop the mainsail into an untidy mess hanging at about reef three in the lazy jacks. This was too much straining on one of the jacks which broke so a great bunt of my main is bouncing along on the water. Then the tack of the jib was torn off. Luckily it is tied all along the luff of the roller furling so it did not tear away. But I have had to roll it up. I'm using a few rolls of my genoa as a small headsail to steady the boat. I don't like doing it because it will damage the sail, but with my only pilot zigzagging all over the place and gybing from time to time. I have had to steer as much as I can to prevent these crash gybes. One laid me completely flat in 30 knots of wind. Getting back on my feet was not difficult, I just let the main sheet right out. But then, because we were screaming along at 20 knots in the wrong direction I had to try a controlled gybe with no running backstays on to avoid smashing the boom."

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Rapscallion III Foto Billy Black

Further back George Stricker was extending his lead over Robin Davie. Stricker described his trouble: "Scare for the day- at daylight I came below and looking forward saw water pouring in with each wave. From the pounding off the backs of waves the two handles had worked loose and the hatch cover opened. Water had filled up the bottom of the watertight door of the forward compartment. About 2.5 feet deep, 1,500 to 2,000 gallons." He easily solved this matter. He closed the hatch, tightened the handles and pumped out the water. He was leading the second part of Class II fleet with just over 1,500 miles to go. Davie, Petersen, Yazykov, Saito and Neil Hunter followed him.

Yazykov was continuing to make progress. He moved ahead of Saito and he was closing on Petersen. The last sailor Fedor Konioukhov was in contact with his son Oscar and reported that his leak was under control and that he was doing 12 knots.

SlunceAlbatros.jpg (12894 bytes)
Foto Richard Konkolski

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Golding

Team Group 4

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

2

Autissier

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

3

Thiercelin

Somewhere

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

4

Hall

PRB

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

5

Soldini

Fila

Cape

Town

0

0

0

0

6

Konioukhov

Mod Univ Human

15 30S

029 15W

2739

4.2

2793.1

1525

7

Reidl

Project Amazon

Retired

0

0

0

0

0

Class 2

Place

Skiper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Mouligne

Cray Valley

34 29S

017 46E

49

5.5

0

2144

2

Garside

Magellan Alpha

36 29S

014 00E

267

10.1

218.1

2144

3

Van Liew

Balance Bar

35 43S

013 27E

268

10

219.1

2144

4

Stricker

Rapscallion III

32 56S

012 48W

1559

7.9

1509.7

2144

5

Davie

South Caroline

35 40S

014 50W

1635

6.1

1585.6

2144

6

Petersen

No Barriers

29 36S

017 35W

1845

7.5

1796.3

2144

7

Yazykov

Wind of Change

25 39S

019 50W

2040

0

1958.8

2144

8

Saito

Shuten-dohji

28 22S

020 44W

2026

8

1976.8

0851

9

Hunter

Paladin II

16 44S

026 08W

2601

7.2

2552.3

2144

Copyright Richard Konkolski
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