Day 16, Sunday December 20

Mored19.jpg (10598 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

Wild weather was developing for the entire fleet. First the last two boats could be hit by winds over 50 knots strong and later the rest of fleet would experience very high winds and big seas.

MSSomewhere2.jpg (15989 bytes) Thiercelin's Somewhere Photo Marek Slodownik
Soldini had extended his lead over Thiercelin to 101 miles. Thiercelin was happy to pass the longitude of Cape Leeuwin, the beginning of Australia. He covered 4,400 miles in 14 days averaging 320 miles a day. But despite the fact that Thiercelin was averaging almost 17 knots at that time, he was overtaken by Golding who took the second position. Isabelle was still dropping behind, currently 365 miles behind Soldini.

BBMagelanAlphaBow.jpg (27572 bytes) Magelan Alpha Photo Billy Black
In Class II Mouligne widened his lead on Garside to 101 miles. Of course Mike was not happy: "It's a bright blue day but my mood is black. Why, oh why are Alphie and I sailing so badly? I can't make up my mind who or what is to blame. The sea is still a mess but at least we have wind so we ought to be rocketing along. Instead, every six hours, JP pulls ahead by another ten miles. Still, we passed the halfway mark last night and that means it's all down hill from here. It's time Alphie and I pulled our socks up and started clawing our way back to the front."

BBSouthCarolinaNarrow.jpg (22486 bytes) Robin Davie's South Carolina Photo Billy Black
Two-time solo circumnavigator Robin Davie finally left Cape Town. He sent his first email from the Indian Ocean: "Well, it's sure good to be back at sea. The South African NSRI lifeboat towed me out of Cape Town yesterday late afternoon, casting off my tow as we reached the breakwater, so that with mainsail and genoa unfurled. I drifted across the line at the breakwater with light westerly airs at about 1630Z, which is about 1830 local time in the evening. I had hoped to be back at sea by last Thursday evening, but the list of jobs to be done, stores and stuff to be purchased, seemed to get greater rather than less. Just packing and stowing everything onboard took over a day. All the essentials were taken care of - but there are still a lot of loose ends to finish off out here now that we are underway. The first 24 hours have not been without their little incidents, starting with the wind and water speed instruments, which are not functioning at all correctly - hopefully we can fix, otherwise I can live without them. Then the big blow was losing the Windex this morning. Again we can live without it. The final blow again at the masthead was the loss of the masthead navigation light. I was down below in the cabin this afternoon when there was a sound-shattering loud explosion, as though a loaded shotgun had gone off in close proximity… Looking around and coming on deck my immediate thoughts were broken boom or mast - or possibly rudder or keel - it was so loud and sudden - but South Carolina was sailing along normally. I could see bits of plastic lying on deck - and looking at the masthead I could see the navigation light base swinging in the wind on the end of its electric cable. I guess it got shaken loose from its bolts, and smashed into the side of the mast, with the bulbs imploding with a loud crack.... "

Moredl4.jpg (18316 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Soldini

Fila

44 44S

126 23E

2371

14.5

0

2140

2

Golding

Team Group 4

45 51S

124 04E

2468

16.5

97.1

2140

3

Thiercelin

Somewhere

45 07S

124 00E

2472

13.7

101

2140

4

Autissier

PRB

42 01S

118 17E

2735

12.9

364.5

2144

5

Hall

Gartmore

48 02S

100 41E

2435

9.9

1064.4

2140

6

Konioukhov

Mod.Univ.Human.

43 11S

039 44E

5919

5.6

3548.2

2140

Class 2

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Mouligne

Cray Valley

48 24S

104 58E

3266

9.7

0

2144

2

Garside

Magellan Alpha

49 19S

102 35E

3367

9

101.2

2144

3

Van Liew

Balance Bar

47 46S

091 03E

3822

11.1

556.1

2144

4

Yazykov

Wind of Change

48 14S

090 50E

3829

10.5

562.5

2144

5

Petersen

No Barriers

46 11S

062 32E

4974

5.3

1707.9

2144

6

Saito

Shuten-dohji II

47 09S

061 29E

4994

7.3

1727.5

2144

7

Hunter

Paladin II

44 49S

057 10E

5214

8.1

1947.8

2144

8

Stricker

Rapscallion III

46 01S

035 52E

5975

8.6

2709

2144

9

Davie

South Carolina

35 57S

018 37E

6957

8.7

3690.9

2144

Copyright Richard Konkolski
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