Day 43, Saturday January 16, 1999

Zapad3.jpg (15918 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

"The wind has gone light in the Tasman parking lot, and I have found myself a parking space. Time to blow again, friends. It worked last time. The sky is clear. I can clearly see the Southern Cross, the Big Dipper and Orion's Belt. It has just gone dark, and more stars are appearing. It's the kind of night to see shooting stars and satellites streaking across the horizons. I hope I will not be up all night as I can do with a good series of naps and not have to nurse the boat, " reported Neal Petersen.

MSNoBarriersBow.jpg (18615 bytes) Petersen's No Barriers Photo Marek Slodownik

Only a couple hours later he sent a new message: "I have just had a mid-ocean collision with some kind of floating object. It is middle of the night, pitch dark on deck with no moon with 12-14 knots wind and a calm sea. 30 minutes ago I went down for a nap, and was rudely awaken by a radical change in motion and noise of a dull thud. My instant thought was that we had run hard aground. The collision stopped this vessel in its tracks. At the time we were doing between 6 and 7 knots. Contents in the galley were thrown off the stove. I do not know what we hit, but what ever it was, was big enough and heavy enough to stop a 7,000 kg boat instantly. I have surveyed the boat as best as I can in the dark and can see no evidence of damage. I will continue sailing and re-survey the boat at first light. I do not appear to be in any danger."

BBSouthCarolinaNarrow.jpg (22486 bytes) Davie's South Carolina Photo Billy Black

By the end of the day Robin Davie was 2412 miles from the finish with 15 days left to the end of leg 2. To be able to finish in time, he should average over 160 miles a day. Taking into consideration the condition of the Tasman Sea, a series of calms, he should gain as many as possible extra miles now to keep the needed average daily distance. It seems that Davie will have a really tough time finishing in the required time limit for continuing in next leg. At least he had rounded the mandatory waypoint. But it was not easy as he reported: "Last nights gale was a short sharp and sweat little beastie. The northerly winds were rising all the time and made reaching the 46 degrees south waypoint area a bit of a bear, the last 6 miles north took the best part of 3 hours, mainly because the monitor self steering took it into its head to bend a safety tube or two… To change the safety tube requires a little visit over the stern to retrieve the paddle and to unpin the hinge the paddle and tube attach to - so there is dunking in the water number one, and then remove the buckled tube, and from the spares fit and bolt on the new tube - now this can be done down below in the cabin - so that's ok, and finally just nip out to the stern again, hang over it waist deep in water head first and pin the hinge back in place whilst holding the paddle - the attributes of an octopus would be real good here."

VlnaSlunceKonstrukce.jpg (14052 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Soldini

Fila

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

2

Thierceli

Somewhere

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

3

Autissier

PRB

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

4

Hall

Gartmore

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

5

Konioukhov

Mod.Univ.Human.

48 05S

142 16E

1715

7.4

1756.5

1901

6

Golding

Team Group 4

Retired

Auckland

0

0

0

0

Class 2

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Mouligne

Cray Valley

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

2

Garside

Magellan Alpha

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

3

Van Liew

Balance Bar

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

4

Yazykov

Wind of Change

Auckland

0

0

0

0

0

5

Saito

Shuten-dohji II

41 03S

160 10E

887

5.9

887.2

2144

6

Petersen

No Barriers

41 16S

160 18E

888

6.8

888.3

2144

7

Hunter

Paladin II

43 18S

149 28E

1377

2.1

1377

2144

8

Davie

South Carolina

46 28S

125 25E

2412

4.7

2412.4

2144

9

Stricker

Rapscallion III

Retired

0

0

0

0

0

Copyright Richard Konkolski
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