Day 08, Saturday February 13, 1999

MSSomewhere2.jpg (15989 bytes)
Thiercelin's Somewhere Photo Marek Slodownik

The remaining three boats of Class I fleet passed 52 degrees south latitude. Thiercelin was firmly holding the lead with Isabelle only 35 miles behind and Soldini in third, only 37 miles behind Autissier. All three boat were averaging 16 knots and making good progress towards Cape Horn.

Moredl.jpg (15007 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

The Southern Ocean was cowered all across with number of low-pressure systems, which indicated that the sailing could be bumpy but fast, as Isabelle describe it in her email: "Fairly peaceful day, with two jibes. I'm near a low that right now doesn't seem very active; moderate winds, which will probably pick up. For the moment, I'm heading directly for the Pacific waypoint. The lows are passing pretty far to the north, so there is no point in going up to find them. The weather is squally, and I have to keep a close watch on my heading. In the gusts, the boat shoots off pretty brutally. A little while ago, I was knocked off the chart table bench and landed on my head... Not many birds, but very beautiful play of light in the squalls. I am slowly catching up with Marc, which is nice, though it doesn't mean much. The real race will happen on the way north after Cape Horn."

The mandatory waypoint was set at 55 S and 120 W. All boats must pass north of this position except dismasted Josh Hall, who was making slow progress toward the Chatham Islands, still over 200 miles away. He hardly covered 46 miles within the last 24 hours.

BBMagelanAlphaStearn.jpg (28476 bytes) Garside and his Magellan Alpha Photo Billy Black

About 540 miles further back, the Class II leader Mike Garside was doing over 11 knots. He reported: "I have held my slender lead now for just 24 hours and already JP is chewing into it. Yesterday he was 78 miles astern and today he has closed the gap to 48. Somehow he manages to sail more than a knot faster than I do. It drives me mad!"

Actually, by the end of the day Mouligne was only 30 miles behind leading Mike. "I have pushed hard in the last 24 hours trying to make up some of my deficit and I was glad to pass Balance Bar and get in second position," he wrote. "I now have to catch up Mike and try to create a good lead…."

BBCrayValleyDetTop.jpg (23320 bytes) Cray Valley Photo Billy Black

"In the last 12 hours I have had Cray Valley almost constantly between 16 and 20 knots, the boat never stops to amaze me."

Viktor Yazykov in fourth was 266 miles behind his Class II leader. He covered his first one thousand miles since Auckland and had a good day run of 262 miles. He was still not able to inspect his boat from outside after hitting the log. He had no signs of damage and the outside inspection he left for calmer days.

Mored11.jpg (21210 bytes)
Photo Richard Konkolski

Positions:

Class 1

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Thiercelin

Somewhere

52 53S

141 52W

3658

16.2

0

2140

2

Autissier

PRB

52 48S

142 48W

3692

15.8

34.4

2140

3

Soldini

Fila

52 06S

143 29W

3729

16.4

71.4

2140

4

Hall

Gartmore

Retiring

to

Chatham Is.

0

0

0

Class 2

Place

Skipper

Boat

Latitude

Longitude

Dist. to go

Speed

Dist. to first

Time

1

Garside

Magellan Alpha

50 45S

156 16W

4201

11.5

0

2144

2

Mouligne

Cray Valley

50 38S

157 04W

4232

12.8

30.4

2144

3

Van Liew

Balance Bar

48 59S

157 19W

4286

10

84.2

2144

4

Yazykov

Wind of Change

46 57S

160 47W

4467

9.5

266

2144

5

Saito

Shuten-dohji II

45 34S

174 55W

5000

8.2

798.3

2144

6

Petersen

No Bariers

45 01S

174 54W

5019

6.9

817.2

2144

7

Hunter

Paladin II

44 35S

176 14W

5079

7.1

877.8

2144

Copyright Richard Konkolski
Return back to Third Leg
Return back to Second Leg
Return back to First Leg
Retyrn back to Sailing Round the World Races
Return back to Seven Oceans